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About Convey

The Breeding Ground for creative people, with the aim to inspire people in finding their passions through sharing our knowledge and wisdom in the field of Business Spirituality & Management.
I believe that following Convey is participating in the continuous flow of creativity, which in turn is part of our unlimited source of positive energy - which undoubtedly unites us to where we are now. In a philosophical way, I try to let the creative minds think about (WHO, WHAT and HOW) Who we really are, What skills we actually have and How we can achieve our goals in society, while helping each other. I do this by posting knowledge packed in various forms and perspectives, influenced by music, art and design.
"Thank you for being inspired"

- Dervin Sno (Conveier)

OUR VISION
With Convey I want to create an online-offline platform for creative people (leaders) in our society, where ideas are exchanged and visions become reality. A balanced environment that allows us to think, move and cooperate as we are naturally inclined to. With this we are working on an innovative and caring society in which everyone takes responsibility and work with each other in good and bad times. An environment in which there is little or no question of self-interest, but where people help/ and stand up for each other no matter the background (skin, religion). With this notion we are creating a society in which we can develop ourselves as real leaders.

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More liked posts

fastcompany:

What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier
Most of us are aware of what happens to the body when we exercise. We build more muscle or more stamina. We feel how daily activities like climbing stairs becomes easier if we exercise regularly. When it comes to our brain and mood though, the connection isn’t so clear.
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fastcompany:

What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier

Most of us are aware of what happens to the body when we exercise. We build more muscle or more stamina. We feel how daily activities like climbing stairs becomes easier if we exercise regularly. When it comes to our brain and mood though, the connection isn’t so clear.

Read More>

Posted on Sunday, April 20th 2014

Tags how it works use your brain our body daily activities mood our brains food for thought science

Reblogged from Fast Company 

I’ve travelled every way possible, and I’ve learned you need only two things (besides good health): some time and money.

[…]

Here is what I learned from 40 years of traveling: Of the two modes, it is far better to have more time than money.

When you have abundant time you can get closer to core of a place. You can hang around and see what really happens. You can meet a wider variety of people. You can slow down until the hour that the secret vault is opened. You have enough time to learn some new words, to understand what the real prices are, to wait out the weather, to get to that place that takes a week in a jeep.

Money is an attempt to buy time, but it rarely is able to buy any of the above.

Kevin Kelly explores why more time is better than more money in a beautiful meditation on travel.

Complement with some advice on travel and life from Founding Father Benjamin Rush, then learn how to worry less about money and why time gets warped while we’re on vacation

(via explore-blog)

Posted on Thursday, April 17th 2014

Tags time travel explore money can't buy no time inspire yourself when i travel

Reblogged from Explore 

Want not, Waste anway

" WE IN THE developed world are generally not working to survive. We have more than enough of everything we need. So much that we can actually afford to waste it ". 

image

- Sinek. S, (2013) Why leaders eat last: Why some teams pull together and others don’t, p.207

Artwork of exhibition Yes NaturallyPhoto by Conveier.

Click here to read the full article.

Posted on Thursday, April 10th 2014

Tags working to survive waste it developed world everything we need art exhibition exhibition yes naturally Simon Sinek why leaders eat last inspire you self consious not working food for thought Environment conveier

A wise person knows when and how to make the exception to every rule… A wise person knows how to improvise… Real-world problems are often ambiguous and ill-defined and the context is always changing. A wise person is like a jazz musician — using the notes on the page, but dancing around them, inventing combinations that are appropriate for the situation and the people at hand. A wise person knows how to use these moral skills in the service of the right aims. To serve other people, not to manipulate other people. And finally, perhaps most important, a wise person is made, not born. Wisdom depends on experience, and not just any experience. You need the time to get to know the people that you’re serving. You need permission to be allowed to improvise, try new things, occasionally to fail and to learn from your failures. And you need to be mentored by wise teachers.

Legendary psychologist Barry Schwartz, author of the enormously stimulating Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing, on our loss of wisdom

(via swissmiss)

I do not fully agree with the sentence “a wise person is made, not born.” Just take a look at (your) children. Watch and observe (the period from baby to toddler) and you will be surprised about things they know, without trial and error. I would say and believe that wisdom also comes from your soul and not always depends on experience in your life. And if you want to go deeper in this stuff you will find out that wisdom also depends on experience from your ancestors that we all take with us in our lives.

Posted on Thursday, April 10th 2014

Tags wisdom from your soul after life ancestors soul and wisdom wise kids barry schwartz Spiritual Guidance trial and error think about it

Reblogged from Explore